Archive for distros

The UTUTO XS Lemote project begins!

This is a quick translation I made of the article that appeared in Ututo’s site: http://www.ututo.org/web/modules/news/news.php?ID_news=368
Thanks to ethana2 for proofreading it.

Some time ago we started toying with the idea of porting our operating system to the new Lemote Yeelong
This computer is characterized by having a completely free hardware design and by not needing any nonfree software components to work.

Unlike other computers we know, it doesn’t use a processor made by the most known companies.
The Lemote company uses a processor developed completely in China, named Loongson. It has a MIPS architecture.

In UTUTO XS, we have had a tradition of development and advocacy of free software for more than 6 years. As the UTUTO project, we thought it would be important to support this hardware starting with version 2010. This would help the spreading of free software and also it would be another choice of operating system for the Lemote computers.

Richard Stallman talked to us about the possibility of getting some Lemote computers as a donation for this project and he put us in contact with the Lemote company in China.

A couple of days later Lemote sent us the Yeelong computers and thanked us for our intention of porting our operating system.

This initiative has the support of institutions that advocate free software and free knowledge.

Among them we can mention:

— Dr. Richard Stallman (father of the free software movement).
— Lemote (Jiangsu Lemote Tech. Co. Ltd, China)
— Free Software Foundation (US)
— Solar (Software Libre Argentina)
— Fundación Instituto de Innovación para el Bienestar Ciudadano (Spain)
— Misol (Misiones Software Libre, Argentina)
— Hipatia (Free Knowledge)
— Asociación de Software Libre de Ecuador (ASLE)
— Fundación Red Especial España

This initiative is the beginning of the project that we internally codenamed “UTUTO XS Lemote”.
The idea is to have an XS system for these computers along with the corresponding updated package repository, just like with the versions for other processors

We think this is an important opportunity to learn and to face the challenge of creating a complete and functional system that would have the user at the core.

Here [0] you can see some pictures of the computers that we’ve got and also how we started the creation of the boot loader of the operating system and the compilation of a basic user system. For the time being we only have a text command line.

We thank all the people who support this project and we will keep you informed with the news on the development of “UTUTO XS Lemote”.

[0] http://erp.ututo.org/album/index.php?album=ututoxs%2FYeelong

Comments (3)

0c:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4311 802.11b/g WLAN (rev 01) take two:

My Broadcom WiFi card is finally working with free software in gNewSense so I decided to make a post to explain how to make that happen for your card as well.

First you need to check your Broadcom WiFi card model: the OpenFWWF site says that 4306, 4311(rev1), 4318 and 4320 are tested and that they work. Not having one of those models is not a reason to try it, though.

Now, you need to install git-core, curl, bison and flex if they are not installed. Get b43-tools (http://git.bu3sch.de/git/b43-tools.git)and compile it.
After that’s done compiling (it should take 2 seconds or so), you need to download the firmware. Lastest firmware as of today is 5.2.
Extract the tar.gz and just “make”. When that’s done compiling (it also takes very little time) you’ll have 3 .fw files in your openfwwf directory. Those 3 files need to be copied to /lib/firmware/b43-open/ .

Then you need to install Linux-libre v2.6.30. A neatly packaged image can be found at my friend Ali Gündüz‘s Freedom Shoppe.

After that you need to pass an option to the b43 module. You do that by adding a line that says “options b43 qos=0” (without quotes) to the /etc/modprobe.d/options file. I also added b43 to /etc/modules but that might not be necessary.

Here’s a step by step copypastable list of all the commands for you (you may need to change the version number of the firmware or the kernel, depending on when you read this post; also make sure that WordPress is not using formatted quotation marks):

cd
sudo apt-get install git-core curl bison flex
git clone git://git.bu3sch.de/b43-tools.git
cd b43-tools/assembler
make
sudo make install
cd
wget http://www.ing.unibs.it/openfwwf/firmware/openfwwf-5.2.tar.gz
tar zxvf openfwwf-5.2.tar.gz
cd openfwwf-5.2
make
sudo mkdir /lib/firmware/b43-open
sudo cp *.fw /lib/firmware/b43-open/
cd
wget http://aligunduz.org/gNewSense/freedomshoppe/linux-image-2.6.30-libre-fshoppe1_i386.deb
sudo dpkg -i linux-image-2.6.30-libre-fshoppe1_i386.deb
sudo -i
echo “options b43 qos=0 nohwcrypt=1” >> /etc/modprobe.d/options
echo “b43” >> /etc/modules
logout

I restarted and booted with the 2.6.30 kernel and my card was working. dmesg confirmed that I was using the free firmware:

[ 8460.884239] b43-phy0: Loading OpenSource firmware version 410.31754 (Hardware crypto not supported)

I would’ve liked it to say “free software”, just like I would’ve liked the firmware to be called free and not open, but that’s extra.

Enjoy your WiFi with freedom!

EDIT: I updated the openfwwf version to 5.2
EDIT2: updated the git repo for b43-tools

Comments (11)

0c:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM94311MCG wlan mini-PCI (rev 01) for GNU/Linux

EDIT2: There’s another post for a working explanation to make a broadcom card work with free software.

EDIT: The method I had explained in this post made use of nonfree firmware. Thanks to Broadcom’s lack of cooperation this wifi card can’t be used nowadays with a Free Software OS.
I’m a Free Software advocate so I decided this post had no place in my blog. If you hate freedom you can ask Scroogle how to make this card work, but the best thing to do would be to complain to Broadcom and refrain from buying from them ever again.

Comments (1)

Ututo XS 2006 Vivo

I have recently been testing some Lignux distros: it’s not that I’m not happy with Kubuntu it’s just that I want a distro where I’m in more control of the contents installed and since I consider myself a kind of Lignux power user (keywords: “kind of”) I don’t think I really need ‘Linux for Human Beings’.
(Just to be fair, I’m not saying Kubuntu is bad, I’m saying that Kubuntu usually just ends up being Ubuntu’s ugly stepsister).

The lack of more interest on Kubuntu from the developers and the need for a distro that gave me more control made me decide to start trying new distros. It is weird that after so many years of being a Lignux user I only tested 2 distros: Slackware and Kubuntu.

So the first distro I decided to test was Ututo.
Ututo, a small lizard that lives in Salta, Argentina, gave its name to the Ututo project. From the Ututo project came the Ututo GNU/Linux distribution which, to this date, is one of the few that follows the 4 rules of software freedom by RMS.

* The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).

* The freedom to study how the program works, and adapt it to your needs (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

* The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).

* The freedom to improve the program, and release your improvements to the public, so that the whole community benefits (freedom 3). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

Stallman said in an interview:

All of the commercial distributors of the GNU/Linux system going back something like 7 or 8 years, have made a practice of including non free software in their distributions, and this is something I have been trying to push against in various ways, without much success. But, in fact, even the non commercial distributors of the GNU plus Linux operating system have been including and distributing non free software, and the sad thing was, that of all the many distributions, until recently there was none, that I could recommend. Now I know of one, that I can recommend, its called “Ututo-e”, it comes from Argentina. I hope that very soon I will be able to recommend another.

[This interview is a little old, now there’s also gNewSense which is free according to the 4 freedoms.]

Stallman’s support for Ututo is so that Ututo’s ISOs are hosted by FSF.

Ututo comes compiled for many architectures, which makes it faster for most computers. It comes with a choice of KDE, Gnome, IceWM, or Fluxbox and it has Beryl too :S It has its own package manager (uget) and the repos do __not__ include any proprietary software.

Now, what I tried was the Live CD from 2006 not the latest installable version (2007) and the 2006 Live CD comes with Gnome and IceWM. So, in case you were wondering… yes, I have been using Gnome for a while (but if I decide to install Ututo I will install KDE, of course).

I should also point out that Ututo was one of the first distros to produce a working live cd, something that was seemingly impossible at the moment.

Overall I really enjoyed the Ututo experience and I like that it provides the freedom that all the other distros lack. And who needs Flash anyway? Gnash won’t let me watch YouTube videos, but I don’t really care, I can download the FLV and watch the videos with my media player of choice.

Here’s link to a screenshot of the Ututo XS 2006 Vivo. To find out more about the Ututo project (which includes much more than just the GNU/Linux distro) you can visit Ututo’s website.

Comments (3)